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submitted 4 hours ago* (last edited 4 hours ago) by Grogon@lemmy.world to c/space@lemmy.world

Individually doing atmospheric analysis for every planet in the galaxy is probably an impossible task for a civilisation confined to a single solar system. Listening for signals is something our civilisation already does. If we discover radio signals from a primitive civilisation in the next star system over there's a non-zero chance we'd panic and try to wipe them out.

That's the risk that dark forest theory is talking about. Maybe the threat comes from a civilisation dedicated to wiping out intelligent life that just hasn't found you yet, maybe it just comes from your nearest neighbor. Maybe there's no threat at all. The risk of interplanetary war is still too great to turn on a light in the forest and risk a bullet from the dark.

And while knowing this, why do we still not choose to just observe and be as quiet/ non existant as possible?

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submitted 14 hours ago by ooli@lemmy.world to c/space@lemmy.world
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Scott provides a nice summary of the Intuitive Machines lunar landing.

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submitted 1 day ago by GreyShuck@feddit.uk to c/space@lemmy.world

When a star like our sun reaches the end of its life, it can ingest the surrounding planets and asteroids that were born with it. Now, using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT) in Chile, researchers have found a unique signature of this process for the first time—a scar imprinted on the surface of a white dwarf star. The results are published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

"It is well known that some white dwarfs—slowly cooling embers of stars like our sun—are cannibalizing pieces of their planetary systems. Now we have discovered that the star's magnetic field plays a key role in this process, resulting in a scar on the white dwarf's surface," says Stefano Bagnulo, an astronomer at Armagh Observatory and Planetarium in Northern Ireland, UK, and lead author of the study.

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submitted 2 days ago by misk@sopuli.xyz to c/space@lemmy.world
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submitted 2 days ago by neptune@dmv.social to c/space@lemmy.world
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submitted 2 days ago by neptune@dmv.social to c/space@lemmy.world
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Orbital Argument (imgs.xkcd.com)

cross-posted from: https://lemmy.world/post/12344130

xkcd #2898: Orbital Argument

https://xkcd.com/2898

Alt text:

"Some people say light is waves, and some say it's particles, so I bet light is some in-between thing that's both wave and particle depending on how you look at it. Am I right?" "YES, BUT YOU SHOULDN'T BE!"

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submitted 4 days ago by Jeredin@lemm.ee to c/space@lemmy.world
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submitted 4 days ago by Wilshire@lemmy.world to c/space@lemmy.world
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submitted 4 days ago by ylai@lemmy.ml to c/space@lemmy.world
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submitted 5 days ago by Ninjazzon@infosec.pub to c/space@lemmy.world

Houston-based Intuitive Machines landed its Odysseus robot near the lunar south pole.

It took some minutes for controllers to establish that the craft was down, but eventually a signal was received.

"What we can confirm, without a doubt, is our equipment is on the surface of the Moon and we are transmitting," flight director Tim Crain announced.

Staff at the company cheered and clapped at the news.

It was an important moment, not just for the commercial exploitation of space but for the US space programme in general.

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submitted 5 days ago by Wilshire@lemmy.world to c/space@lemmy.world
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submitted 5 days ago by kinther@lemmy.world to c/space@lemmy.world
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submitted 1 week ago by ooli@lemmy.world to c/space@lemmy.world

And SciFi will change forever with flat planets

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submitted 1 week ago by Flumpkin@slrpnk.net to c/space@lemmy.world

Just ignore the unscientific music 😉 As a fan of space travel I think this is a very interesting study for observations how people can move around in zero gravity collaboratively. Not just dance or sports but also working together.
Music video on Invidious. The behind the scenes video (invidious) is also very interesting.

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submitted 1 week ago by GreyShuck@feddit.uk to c/space@lemmy.world

A comet is set to pass by Earth this spring, and it may be missing its tail.

The comet poses no danger to Earth—it is about the same distance from our planet as we are from the sun—but scientists need images of C/2021 S3 Pannstars from amateur astronomers to improve forecasts of space weather. These forecasts are vital to prevent problems caused by solar winds, which are streams of particles containing solar storms that can damage technology in space and on Earth.

Sarah Watson, the University of Reading Ph.D. researcher leading the project, said, "What we are expecting to see may look rather unusual. When we talk about comets, people often think of a large, bright sphere followed by a long thin tail."

"The comet we are observing may look different as its tail could 'detach' as it is buffeted by solar winds."

"We need lots of timed photos of the comet to build up a picture of its journey through our solar system. This is a fantastic opportunity for amateur astronomers to get out their telescopes, capture a truly spectacular cosmic moment, and make a big contribution to some important science."

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submitted 1 week ago by GreyShuck@feddit.uk to c/space@lemmy.world

A few years ago, astronomers uncovered one of the Milky Way's greatest secrets: An enormous, wave-shaped chain of gaseous clouds in our sun's backyard, giving birth to clusters of stars along the spiral arm of the galaxy we call home.

Naming this astonishing new structure the Radcliffe Wave, in honor of the Harvard Radcliffe Institute, where the undulation was originally discovered, the team now reports in Nature that the Radcliffe Wave not only looks like a wave, but also moves like one—oscillating through space-time much like "the wave" moving through a stadium full of fans.

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submitted 1 week ago by Wilshire@lemmy.world to c/space@lemmy.world
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